Exsúrge, Dómine - Arise, O Lord

Exsúrge, Dómine – Arise, O God, Judge Thy Own Cause

“Arise, O Lord, and judge your own cause. Remember your reproaches to those who are filled with foolishness all through the day. Listen to our prayers, for foxes have arisen seeking to destroy the vineyard whose winepress you alone have trod.” ~ Pope Leo X The Israelites cried “Arise, O Lord” in confident expectation of victories over all their enemies through God’s intervention. Therefore, no matter how perilous the circumstances may be, and no matter how powerful the enemies of the Mystical Body of Christ are (which is the Church), the Lord will arise for the sake of Christendom if[…]

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Te Deum laudamus Hymn

Te Deum laudamus

Te Deum laudamus, ( Latin: “God, We Praise You”, ) is an Early Christian Hymn of praise. Traditionally ascribed to Saint Ambrose and Saint Augustine. In the Roman Breviary it is entitled as “Hymnus SS. Ambrosii et Augustini”. In the traditional office, the Te Deum is sung at the end of Matins on all days when the Gloria is said at Mass; those days are all Sundays outside Advent, Septuagesima, Lent, and Passiontide; on all feasts (except the Triduum) and on all ferias during Eastertide. A plenary indulgence is granted, under the usual conditions, to those who recite it in[…]

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Christ the King

Christus vincit, Christus regnat, Christus imperat!

The Feast of Christ the King – Domini Nostri Jesu Christi Regis – was established by Pope Pius XI in 1925 in the encyclical Quas Primas, as an antidote to secularism, a way of life which leaves God out of man’s thinking and living and organizes his life as if God did not exist. The feast is intended to proclaim in a striking and effective manner Christ’s royalty over individuals, families, society, governments, and nations. “If to Christ our Lord is given all power in heaven and on earth; if all men, purchased by his precious blood, are by a[…]

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Icon of the Laudation of the Mother of God

Akathist Hymn to the Blessed Virgin Mary

Ad maiorem Matris Gloriam – For the Greater Glory of the Mother The 6th century Marian devotion, attributed to St. Romanos the Melodist, is one of the greatest marvels of Greek religious poetry, with a richness of imagery that is the despair of any translator. The title “Akathistos” literally means “non-sitting,” because all remain standing while it is sung. When the enemies attacked Constantinople, the citizens would hold a cross procession on the city walls carrying the Christian sanctities and reading out the Akathist Hymn to the Mother of God. The Akathist hymn was complemented by a new introduction in[…]

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Dies Irae

Dies Irae (The Day of Wrath)

The Last Judgment, Final Judgment, Day of Judgment, Judgment Day, or The Day of the Lord in Christian theology, is the final and eternal judgment by God of all nations. It will take place after the resurrection of the dead and the Second Coming of Christ (Revelation 20:12–15). The doctrine, iconographic depiction and musical compositions of the “Last Judgment” are drawn from many passages from the apocalyptic sections of the Bible, but most notably from Jesus’ teaching of the strait gate in the Gospel of Matthew and also found in the Gospel of Luke. Dies Irae (The Day of Wrath)[…]

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Rorate Mass

Rorate Cæli Mass & Hymn of the Catholic Faith

Did your community have at least one Rorate Mass this Advent? Rorate Cæli is one of the most beautiful Hymns of the Catholic Faith. The text of this piece is a faithful rendition of the verse from the Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 45:8) in Vulgate and other sources. It is a reverent and humble supplication to the mercy of God. It is a hymn of repentance and sorrow. The following recording comes from the Trappist Abbey of Citeaux in France. To listen, tap the play button. Latin English Rorate Cæli desuper,Et nubes pluant justum. Drop down dew, ye heavens, from aboveAnd let the clouds[…]

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The Angelus Chant

The Angelus – Prayer for Peace and Tranquility

Like a heavenly messenger, the Angelus calls us to interrupt our daily, earthly routines, and turn to thoughts of God, of the Blessed Mother, and of eternity. The Angelus originated during the time of Crusades as a prayer for peace and tranquillity in the land of living and for their country. The devotion is traditionally sung in Roman Catholic churches, convents, and monasteries (and should be recited at home), three times daily at 6:00 a.m., Noon, and 6:00 p.m. Indulgenced by Pope Benedict XIII, Sept 14, 1724. For centuries the Angelus was always said while kneeling, but Pope Benedict XIV[…]

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Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Litany of Loretto)

Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Litany of Loretto)

The Litany of Loretto was introduced into the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore by Cardinal Francesco Toledo in 1597; and in 1613, Pope Paul V ordered it to be sung in that church, morning and evening, on Saturdays and on vigils and feasts of the Madonna. “From the first day of next October, therefore, until the second day of the November following, in every parish and, if the ecclesiastical authority deem it opportune and of use, in every chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin – let five decades of the Rosary be recited with the addition of the Litany of[…]

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Laudate Dominum by Mozart

Laudate Dominum

“Laudate Dominum” from Vesperae solennes de confessore, KV 339by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). Singer: Kiri te Kanawa The first part of the text is the entire Psalm 116  [117]. With just two verses and sixteen words in Hebrew, it is the shortest of all 150 psalms. As with the other Psalms, “Laudate Dominum” is concluded with a trinitarian doxology (Gloria Patri) when used in the Roman rite.  In Catholic churches, the Psalm may be sung after the blessing at the devotional service called Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. Latin Text English Translation Laudáte Dóminum omnes gentesomnes populi;Quóniam confirmáta estsúper nos misericordia eiuset véritas Domini mánet[…]

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Litany of Saints

Litaniae Sanctorum – The Litany of the Saints

A The Litany of the Saints (Litaniae Sanctorum) is a traditional chant in the Catholic Church that praises God and his saints. Its first recorded use was in 590 when Pope St. Gregory prescribed its usage for a public procession of thanksgiving. The Litany is a call to remember those who have gone before us and to ask their intercession. The form given below is a long standing traditional form of the Litany Saints published in the Roman Ritual, Latin-English edition in 1952. A partial indulgence is attached to the Litany of the Saints. Litaniae Sanctorum – The Litany of[…]

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Council of Vigilance and Restoration of Sacred Music by Pope St. Pius X

On the Restoration of Sacred Music by Pope Pius X – “Tra Le Sollecitudini”

Motu Proprio promulgated by Pope Pius X on November 22, 1903 I. General Principles II. The different kinds of Sacred Music III. The Liturgical Text IV. External form of the sacred compositions V. The singers VI. Organ and instruments VII. The length of the liturgical chant VIII. Principal means IX. Conclusion Among the cares of the pastoral office, not only of this Supreme Chair, which We, though unworthy, occupy through the inscrutable dispositions of Providence, but of every local church, a leading one is without question that of maintaining and promoting the decorum of the House of God in which[…]

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Song of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Magnificat

The Magnificat – Canticle of the Blessed Virgin Mary

The Magnificat is a canticle, also known as the Song of Mary, the Canticle of Mary and, in the Byzantine tradition, the Ode of the Theotokos. The text of the canticle is taken directly from the Gospel of Luke (1:46–55) where it is spoken by Mary upon the occasion of her Visitation to her cousin Elizabeth. An explanation of the Canticle Magnificat is given below from the “Devout instructions on the Epistles and Gospels for the Sundays and holydays” by Leonard Goffiné (1648-1719). In this hymn Mary with joy praises God, the Lord, that He has regarded her humility, and[…]

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