Song of Zechariah

Benedictus Dominus Deus Israel (Canticle of Zachary)

The Benedictus is the Song of Zechariah, or Canticle of Zachary, given in the Gospel of Luke 1:68-79, is one of the three canticles in the opening chapters of this Gospel, the other two being the “Magnificat” and the “Nunc dimittis”. The Benedictus was the song of thanksgiving uttered by Zechariah who was filled with the Holy Spirit, on the occasion of the birth of his son, John the Baptist. In the Roman Catholic Church, the Benedictus is part of The Divine Office, that takes place in the early morning hours. The canticle received its name from its first words in[…]

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Regina Cæli or Regina Cœli Queen of Heaven

♕ Regina Cæli: Easter Anthem and Prayer

“There is a venerable tradition connected with this joyous anthem.  It is related that a fearful pestilence raged in Rome, during one of the Easters of the pontificate of St. Gregory the Great.  In order to propitiate the anger of God, the holy Pope prescribed a public procession of both people and clergy, in which was to be carried the portrait of our blessed Lady painted by St. Luke.  The procession was advancing in the direction of St. Peter’s; and as the holy picture, followed by the Pontiff, was carried along, the atmosphere became pure and free from pestilence.  Having[…]

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Monstrance

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Hymns & Prayers

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament Benediction is a beautiful word. It means a blessing, a greeting, an expression of kindness and love. Benediction is also a beautiful church service in which the congregation is blessed with the Blessed Sacrament. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament is a liturgical rite that was once popular in the Latin Rite. Since the re-introduction of the Latin Rite Mass or the Roman Mass, popularly referred to as “The Traditional Latin Mass,”  Benediction has been making a comeback, which is a great blessing for souls and for the honour of Jesus Christ Who is Truly Present,[…]

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Nativity of St. John the Baptist

“Ut queant laxis” – The Nativity of St. John the Baptist Latin Hymn

“O for your spirit, holy John, to chastenLips sin-polluted, fettered tongues to loosen;So by your children might your deeds of wonderMeetly be chanted.” Paolo Diacono (Paul the Deacon) (ca. 720 – ca. 799) a monk of Monte Cassino and a friend of Charlemagne, had composed, in honour of St. John the Baptist, the hymn: “Ut queant laxis.” In the thirteenth century the Benedictine monk Guy of Arezzo noticed that the notes sung on the first syllabes formed the sequence of the first six degrees of the scale. He named each degree by the corresponding syllable: “Ut, re, mi, fa, sol,[…]

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Sacris sollemniis Latin Hymn by St Thomas Aquinas

Sacris solemniis

“Sacris solemniis” is one of the five beautiful hymns St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) composed in honor of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament at specific request of Pope Urban IV (1261-1264) when the Pope first established the Feast of Corpus Christi in 1264. Today Sacris Solemniis is used as a hymn for the Office of the Readings for Corpus Christi. The last two stanzas are the text for the hymn Panis Angelicus. “Sacris solemniis” Latin and English Lyrics Sacris solemniisiuncta sint gaudia,et ex praecordiissonent praeconia;recedant vetera,nova sint omnia,corda, voces, et opera. At this our solemn feastlet holy joys abound,and from the[…]

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Resurrection of Christ

Victimae Paschali Laudes

Victimae Paschali Laudes is one of the medieval sequences that were preserved in the Missale Romanum published in 1570 after the Council of Trent (1545-1563), this poetic liturgical hymn continues to be sung at the Tridentine Mass on Easter Sunday and through its Octave. The Easter sequence, attributed to Wipo of Burgundy (✞ 1048). This ancient chant tells the story of death and life locked in a struggle, wherein Christ, the Paschal victim, victorious over death, reconciles us to the Father. It tells the story of Mary Magdalene, who upon finding the empty tomb of the risen Christ and of finding the[…]

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Mater Inviolata

Inviolata es Maria – 11th Century Hymn and Prayer

“Inviolata es Maria” is an traditional Gregorian chant in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This composition goes back to 11th century. INVIOLATA, integra, et casta es Maria, quae es effecta fulgida caeli porta. INVIOLATE, spotless and pure art thou, O Mary Who wast made the radiant gate of Heaven. O Mater alma Christi carissima, suscipe pia laudum praeconia. Holy mother of Christ most dear, receive our devout hymn and praise. Te nunc flagitant devota corda et ora, nostra ut pura pectora sint et corpora. Our hearts and tongues now ask of thee that our souls and bodies may be[…]

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Celestial Sphere Painting from the Church of the Holy Sepulcher

Gregorian Chant Hymns to the Holy Trinity

“All life begins in the Trinity, comes from the Trinity, and is destined to seek eternal rest in the Trinity. Even damned souls, by suffering punishment for having rejected love, finally do glorify God’s justice. The life of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, mystery of divine mysteries, is a mutual giving so complete that the Divine Persons do not exist except in relation to one another. The divine life They share with Christ’s members through Baptism is meant to be shared with all peoples through the apostolic zeal of Christians.”  1962 TLM Missal Raphael’s Exhortation (Tobit 12:6-8) Then he said to[…]

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Veni, Creator Spiritus

“Veni Creator Spiritus” is one of the most widely used hymns in the Church, attributed to Rabanus Maurus (776-856). It is chanted at Vespers, Pentecost, Dedication of a Church, Confirmation, and Holy Orders and whenever the Holy Ghost is solemnly invoked. A partial indulgence is granted to the faithful who recite it. A plenary indulgence is granted if it is recited on January 1st or on the feast of Pentecost. Veni, Creator Spiritus, mentes tuorum visita, imple superna gratia quae tu creasti pectora. O Come, Creator Spirit, come; The souls which are Thine own invade; And with supernal grace inflame[…]

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Latin Hym Panis Angelicus: The Bread of Angels

Panis Angelicus: The Bread of Angels

“Panis Angelicus” comes from the last two stanzas of the hymn “Sacris solemniis” composed by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) for the Feast of Corpus Christi and of the Votive Office of the Most Blessed Sacrament. The hymn expresses the doctrine that the bread and wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ. In the Roman Catholic tradition the concept of transubstantiation is presented as an explanation of how this change happens. It directs us to contemplate the great mystery of becoming one with Jesus Himself whenever we receive Him. God Himself becomes our nourishment. It then proceeds to ask[…]

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The Angelus Chant

The Angelus – Prayer for Peace and Tranquility

The Angelus originated during the time of Crusades as a prayer for peace and tranquillity for their country. To be said or sung at 6:00 a.m., Noon, and 6:00 p.m.  Indulgenced by Pope Benedict XIII, Sept 14, 1724. Listen to “The Angelus prayer from the “Day in the Cloister” – a chant CD available from the Virgo Sacrata shop. Audio courtesy of the Congregation of the Daughters of Mary. The Angelus Prayer in Latin and English Latin V/. Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae; R/. Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto. Ave Maria,gratia plena,Dominus tecum.Benedicta tu in mulieribus,et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus.Sancta Maria,Mater Dei,ora[…]

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Mozart Effect

Doctor Mozart and Gregorian Chant

By Fr. Dominique Bourmaud, August 2010 edition of the The Angelus magazine. The Mozart Effect Most classical music lovers will have heard of The Mozart Effect. Don Campbell, author of this book, explains that music can help transform health, education, and well-being. Music was found to reduce stress, depression, or anxiety and improve memory. Mozart was seen to drastically lessen epileptic fits in a comatose state, help direct rats out of a maze, and make cows yield more milk. The tastiest results occurred when Japanese yeast listened (!) to Mozart. The discoverer of the Mozart effect comes from overseas. He has[…]

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