Ember Days of Prayer, Fasting & Abstinence

What are Ember Days and what is their place in the life of the Church?

The 1917 Catholic Encyclopedia explains: “The purpose of their introduction, besides the general one intended by all prayer and fasting, was to thank God for the gifts of nature, to teach men to make use of them in moderation, and to assist the needy. The immediate occasion was the practice of the heathens of Rome. The Romans were originally given to agriculture, and their native gods belonged to the same class. At the beginning of the time for seeding and harvesting religious ceremonies were performed to implore the help of their deities: in June for a bountiful harvest, in September[…]

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Advent Season

The Advent Season: Sermon by Father De Pauw

This Sunday is the 1st Sunday of Advent and the first Sunday of a new liturgical year. The word ” advent” comes from the Latin word adventus ..arrival …the coming of someone very special. The Advent season is a season whose liturgical color is purple, the color indicating a time of serious thinking supported by some extra penance. The color purple is the chemical result of the light of the rising sun piercing through the darkness of the night. Spiritually the symbol of the darkness of life without God since the original sin of the first parents, gradually being pushed[…]

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Christian Prayer for the Conversion of our Country

Christian Prayer for the Conversion of our Country

This Litany is a timely christian prayer we should say often, imploring God’s mercy for the conversion of our country, or your country [You name it]. Lord, have mercy on us.Christ, have mercy on us.God the Father of heaven, have mercy on us.God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us.God the Holy Ghost, have mercy on us.Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us. O God, who hast been pleased to magnify Thy name amongst our ancestors, and to distinguish them by the particular marks of their piety, continue the same mercy to us, we beseech Thee:[…]

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Come to Mass

Come to Mass! Come, Children, Come to the Traditional Latin Mass!

“Come to Mass! Come, children, come to Mass, and bring your merry hearts with you. Come, you that are young and pray, and rejoice before the Lord. Come, you that are old and weary, and tell your loneliness to God. Come, you that are sorely tempted, and ask the help of heaven. Come, you that have sinned, and weep between the porch and the altar. Come, you that are bereaved, and pour out here your tears. Come, you that are sick, or anxious, or unhappy, and complain to god. Come, you that are prosperous and successful, and give thanks. Christ[…]

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Penance

How was Advent formerly observed?

Very differently from now. It then commenced with the Feast of St. Martin, and was observed by the faithful like the Forty Days’ Fast, with strict penance and devotional exercises, as even now most of the religious communities do to the present day. The Church has forbidden all turbulent amusements, weddings, dancing and concerts, during Advent. Pope Sylverius ordered that those who seldom receive Holy Communion should, at least, do so on every Sunday in Advent. The Church called us to follow the strict norms not so long ago. In the Orthodox Church, fasting remains normative for 40 days prior[…]

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Second Coming of Christ

“On The Second Coming of Christ” by St. Cyril of Jerusalem

“On the Clause, And Shall Come in Glory to Judge the Quick and the Dead; Of Whose Kingdom There Shall Be No End” by St. Cyril Of Jerusalem. Source: “A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church” Vol 7, Lecture 15. “I beheld till thrones were placed, and one that was ancient of days did sit, and then, I saw in a vision of the night, and behold one like unto the Son of Man came with the clouds of heaven” — Daniel 7: 9-14. [1811] Ps. lxxii. 6. See xii. 9; and § 10, below.[…]

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First Sunday of Advent

The First Sunday of Advent

The Savior, then, who is coming to us is the clothing which we are to put on over our spiritual nakedness. Here let us admire the goodness of our God, who, remembering that man hid himself after his sin, because he was naked, vouchsafes himself to become man’s clothing, and cover with the robe of his Divinity the misery of human nature. Let us, therefore, be on the watch for the day and the hour when he will come to us, and take precautions against the drowsiness which comes of custom and self-indulgence. The light will soon appear; may its[…]

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