Resurrection of Christ

Victimae Paschali Laudes

Victimae Paschali Laudes is one of the medieval sequences that were preserved in the Missale Romanum published in 1570 after the Council of Trent (1545-1563), this poetic liturgical hymn continues to be sung at the Tridentine Mass on Easter Sunday and through its Octave. The Easter sequence, attributed to Wipo of Burgundy (✞ 1048). This ancient chant tells the story of death and life locked in a struggle, wherein Christ, the Paschal victim, victorious over death, reconciles us to the Father. It tells the story of Mary Magdalene, who upon finding the empty tomb of the risen Christ and of finding the[…]

Posted on
Have mercy on me, O God

Miserere Mei Deus – Have mercy on me, O God

Psalmus 50 (51) Psalm 50 (51) 1 In finem Psalmus David 1 Unto the end, a psalm of David, 2 Cum venit ad eum Nathan propheta quando intravit ad Bethsabee 2 when Nathan the prophet came to him after he had sinned with Bethsabee. 3 Miserere mei Deus secundum magnam misericordiam tuam et secundum multitudinem miserationum tuarum dele iniquitatem meam 3 Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy great mercy. And according to the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my iniquity. 4 Amplius lava me ab iniquitate mea et a peccato meo munda me 4 Wash[…]

Posted on
Laudate Dominum by Mozart

Laudate Dominum

“Laudate Dominum” from Vesperae solennes de confessore, KV 339by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). Singer: Kiri te Kanawa The first part of the text is the entire Psalm 116  [117]. With just two verses and sixteen words in Hebrew, it is the shortest of all 150 psalms. As with the other Psalms, “Laudate Dominum” is concluded with a trinitarian doxology (Gloria Patri) when used in the Roman rite.  In Catholic churches, the Psalm may be sung after the blessing at the devotional service called Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. Latin Text English Translation Laudáte Dóminum omnes gentesomnes populi;Quóniam confirmáta estsúper nos misericordia eiuset véritas Domini mánet[…]

Posted on
Improperia “Popule meus, quid feci tibi?”

Improperia “Popule meus, quid feci tibi?”

The Improperia are the reproaches which in the liturgy of the Office of Good Friday the Saviour is made to utter against the Jews, who, in requital for all the Divine favours and particularly for the delivery from the bondage of Egypt and safe conduct into the Promised Land, inflicted on Him the ignominies of the Passion and a cruel death. It is during the Adoration of the Cross that these touching remonstrances are rendered by the choir. In all they consist of three distinct parts. Of these the third — composed of the antiphon “Crucem tuam adoramus”, the first[…]

Posted on
Monstrance

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Hymns & Prayers

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament Benediction is a beautiful word. It means a blessing, a greeting, an expression of kindness and love. Benediction is also a beautiful church service in which the congregation is blessed with the Blessed Sacrament. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament is a liturgical rite that was once popular in the Latin Rite. Since the re-introduction of the Latin Rite Mass or the Roman Mass, popularly referred to as “The Traditional Latin Mass,”  Benediction has been making a comeback, which is a great blessing for souls and for the honour of Jesus Christ Who is Truly Present,[…]

Posted on
Pange Lingua St-Thomas Aquinas

Pange Lingua Gloriosi Hymn

At the request of Pope Urban IV St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) composed the office (the official prayers of the Church) for the feast. This office is the source of the famous Eucharistic hymns Pange Lingua Gloriosi and Tantum Ergo Sacramentum (the final two verses of the Pange Lingua). The hymn expresses the doctrine of transubstantiation, in which, according to the Roman Catholic faith, the bread and wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ. Liturgical Use: Vespers hymn on the Feast of Corpus Christi: the Tangtum Ergo and doxology are sung during Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. It is used also as[…]

Posted on
Mater Dolorosa

Stabat Mater Dolorosa

Stabat Mater Dolorosa is considered one of the seven greatest Latin hymns of all time.  It is based upon the prophecy of Simeon that a sword was to pierce the heart of Our Lord’s mother, Mary (Lk2:35). The hymn title means “‘Stood the mother, full of grief’.”  In Latin, the hymn consists of twenty couplets which describe the Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin at the Cross.  The Stabat Mater’s popularity is reflected by its use in the popular devotion of the Stations of the Cross. The message of the Stabat Mater focuses on the spiritual and emotional bond which unites Mary and all[…]

Posted on
Mozart Effect

Doctor Mozart and Gregorian Chant

By Fr. Dominique Bourmaud, August 2010 edition of the The Angelus magazine. The Mozart Effect Most classical music lovers will have heard of The Mozart Effect. Don Campbell, author of this book, explains that music can help transform health, education, and well-being. Music was found to reduce stress, depression, or anxiety and improve memory. Mozart was seen to drastically lessen epileptic fits in a comatose state, help direct rats out of a maze, and make cows yield more milk. The tastiest results occurred when Japanese yeast listened (!) to Mozart. The discoverer of the Mozart effect comes from overseas. He has[…]

Posted on