Gregorian Requiem Chants of the Requiem Mass

Libera me, Domine, de morte æterna

Líbera me (“Deliver me”) is a Roman Catholic responsory that is sung in the Office of the Dead and at the absolution of the dead, a service of prayers for the dead said beside the coffin immediately after the Requiem Mass and before burial. The text of Libera me asks God to have mercy upon the deceased person at the Last Judgment. Libera me is begun by a cantor, who sings the versicles alone, and the responses are sung by the choir. The text is written in the first person singular, “Deliver me, O Lord, from eternal death on that[…]

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Mater Inviolata

Inviolata es Maria – 11th Century Hymn and Prayer

“Inviolata es Maria” is an traditional Gregorian chant in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This composition goes back to 11th century. INVIOLATA, integra, et casta es Maria, quae es effecta fulgida caeli porta. INVIOLATE, spotless and pure art thou, O Mary Who wast made the radiant gate of Heaven. O Mater alma Christi carissima, suscipe pia laudum praeconia. Holy mother of Christ most dear, receive our devout hymn and praise. Te nunc flagitant devota corda et ora, nostra ut pura pectora sint et corpora. Our hearts and tongues now ask of thee that our souls and bodies may be[…]

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Monstrance

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Hymns & Prayers

Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament Benediction is a beautiful word. It means a blessing, a greeting, an expression of kindness and love. Benediction is also a beautiful church service in which the congregation is blessed with the Blessed Sacrament. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament is a liturgical rite that was once popular in the Latin Rite. Since the re-introduction of the Latin Rite Mass or the Roman Mass, popularly referred to as “The Traditional Latin Mass,”  Benediction has been making a comeback, which is a great blessing for souls and for the honour of Jesus Christ Who is Truly Present,[…]

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Magnificat - The Canticle of Mary

Magníficat ánima mea Dóminum

The Magnificat, the canticle of the Incarnation, recalls to us each day that God has stripped Himself of His glory to clothe Himself in the livery of poor and suffering humanity. “He raised [Mary] above all others because she declared herself to be the lowest of all creatures. When He made for Himself a dwelling place on earth, it was not in the palaces of kings. He chose poor, humble parents and all that the world disdained in order to cast down its pomp. This was the proper character of divine power in the new alliance: to make its virtue[…]

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Latin Hym Panis Angelicus: The Bread of Angels

Panis Angelicus: The Bread of Angels

“Panis Angelicus” comes from the last two stanzas of the hymn “Sacris solemniis” composed by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) for the Feast of Corpus Christi and of the Votive Office of the Most Blessed Sacrament. The hymn expresses the doctrine that the bread and wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ. In the Roman Catholic tradition the concept of transubstantiation is presented as an explanation of how this change happens. It directs us to contemplate the great mystery of becoming one with Jesus Himself whenever we receive Him. God Himself becomes our nourishment. It then proceeds to ask[…]

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Mozart Effect

Doctor Mozart and Gregorian Chant

By Fr. Dominique Bourmaud, August 2010 edition of the The Angelus magazine. The Mozart Effect Most classical music lovers will have heard of The Mozart Effect. Don Campbell, author of this book, explains that music can help transform health, education, and well-being. Music was found to reduce stress, depression, or anxiety and improve memory. Mozart was seen to drastically lessen epileptic fits in a comatose state, help direct rats out of a maze, and make cows yield more milk. The tastiest results occurred when Japanese yeast listened (!) to Mozart. The discoverer of the Mozart effect comes from overseas. He has[…]

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Liturgical hymns in Gregorian ChantLiturgical hymns in Gregorian Chant

Te Sæculorum Principem: Thou, Prince of all ages

Te Sæculorum Principem (Thou, Prince of all ages) is a very moving hymn, expressing love and desire for Jesus Christ and His reign over the hearts and minds of men, but also over society at large. This is a doctrine that has always been taught by the Catholic Church: namely, that Jesus Christ should reign even in the public sphere. His laws should be helped and fostered by the civil laws, which in turn should never contradict the Divine Law. Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius X, and Archbishop Lefebvre, fought against the perfidious error which spread among Church men,[…]

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Have mercy on me, O God

Miserere Mei Deus – Have mercy on me, O God

Psalmus 50 (51) Psalm 50 (51) 1 In finem Psalmus David 1 Unto the end, a psalm of David, 2 Cum venit ad eum Nathan propheta quando intravit ad Bethsabee 2 when Nathan the prophet came to him after he had sinned with Bethsabee. 3 Miserere mei Deus secundum magnam misericordiam tuam et secundum multitudinem miserationum tuarum dele iniquitatem meam 3 Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy great mercy. And according to the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my iniquity. 4 Amplius lava me ab iniquitate mea et a peccato meo munda me 4 Wash[…]

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Pange Lingua St-Thomas Aquinas

Pange Lingua Gloriosi Hymn

At the request of Pope Urban IV St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) composed the office (the official prayers of the Church) for the feast. This office is the source of the famous Eucharistic hymns Pange Lingua Gloriosi and Tantum Ergo Sacramentum (the final two verses of the Pange Lingua). The hymn expresses the doctrine of transubstantiation, in which, according to the Roman Catholic faith, the bread and wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ. Liturgical Use: Vespers hymn on the Feast of Corpus Christi: the Tangtum Ergo and doxology are sung during Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. It is used also as[…]

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